athletes, boxing, Dallas Cowboys, fast, football, nascar, sexy, WWE

Barbara Terry interview with Sugar Ray Leonard

Sugar Ray Leonard is a man who needs little introduction. He is a two-time World Boxing champion, once winning the WBC World Welterweight and WBA Junior Heavyweight championships. He is a former Olympic gold medalist, winning it all at the 1976 games. He won two AAU championships, the Pan AM Games in 1975 and three Amateur National Golden Gloves titles. He was voted the boxer of the ’80s and is considered one of the greatest boxers of all time.

What do you miss most about boxing?

It’s so amazing for me and other people. You don’t appreciate things until they’re gone. The moments that I cherish with my family, my dad, my brother, my friends, I miss my friends. I don’t miss boxing, I miss the camaraderie. Being around my friends and family, when that comes to an end it’s, like…wow…

It’s very unique that you say that because a lot of ath­letes that are in the book are from team sports, like hockey, baseball or football. Some of them are retired, some of them are getting ready to retire. My question to them is always: Number 1, What are you going to do with yourself, and, number 2, Are you going to miss it? The team sports guys always tell me that they miss the camaraderie and their teammates. That’s what they talk about It’s interesting to hear you say the same thing, because boxing isn’t considered a team sport…

Boxing is individual, although there’s a team concept because you need a great corner. You need a great trainer, you need a great prep man, you need all of these things, but it’s more of a mano a mano. It’s more you versus me. I miss that time in training camp, and Dad and Mom cooking meals. It was one big family.

Right. All of the people that surrounded you and assisted you in your sport and all of those people cre­ated an unspoken team.

Right, right. Yeah, exactly.

Operating as a team sport instead as a one-on-one.

Exactly. Now that I look back on it, it was a team. You know, the trainers were more than just training me, they were rooting for me with their spirit and with their belief. It was awesome.

Well, for you to be successful, you really had to have that foundation and that belief. If you look at the real successful athletes, it seems that they had the strong push from their parents, and it seems like your par­ents totally supported you and gave you that neces­sary foundation.

Yes. I started boxing when I was 14. When people look at me or meet me, even my wife, she can’t believe that I was a fighter because I don’t look mean.

You don’t look mean. (I laugh because it’s true, but he was a world champion boxer. He chuckles as well). Right. I don’t have that edge or that air. I just don’t. So when they show a documentary about me, I look and I can’t connect the two. I mean, I am who I am. This is truly the way I am. I remember, eight months ago, they honored me at the Riviera Country Club. It was me, my wife and my kids. Daniel was seven at the time and Camilla was 11, and they showed old highlights of my career: the Olympics, some championship fights. I was watching my kids through my peripheral vision, and they’d look at me and they’d look up there at the screen because they couldn’t believe it, because, to them, I am Papa!

Right. They were having a hard time putting two and two together. (We both laughed hard at the thought of his wide-eyed son, puzzled at his father mauling so many hapless opponents. Doubt they’ll ever break curfew or get smart with dear old Dad!)

It was the cutest thing ever; it was so cute because they just could not believe that was their papa! I asked my kids, ‘Do you know what Papa used to do?’ They said, ‘You were a boxer. You won the Olympics!’And that’s what they know.

But they don’t know the visual of the sport itself.

No they do not, which is good.

What was your first car?

I wish I had that car. It was a dark blue 1967 Chevy Nova. I bought that car myself; I paid, like, $300 for the car. I worked at the Glen Arm Recreation Center. I saved my money and I saved my money and I bought the car. I remember, back then, years ago, you could change the gas pedal for a metal foot, so I did that because it was the cool thing to do. Then I changed my gear shift into a little ball. Yeah, and I had a little crucifix on the rearview mirror. That car was mine. I was so proud of that car. I bought that car with my own money and I cherished that car. It was so cute; I wish I had it again.

Where do you think that car is now?

Jesus Christ. I was looking for it.

You should find the VIN number and find it; it might still be in one piece!

You know what? My little car was so resilient; I bet it’s still around. I might put an APB out on it.

(WE LAUGH.) See, you have a passion about that first car. You bought it with your own money.

Oh, I did. It was my car. I bought it with my own money. I saved and I kept it clean.

Can you drive a stick shift?

Yes. Not well, but I can because I had my toys. I’ve had the Porsche, I had a Maserati, a Ferrari, I had all of those little toys.

And what happened?

I never drove it because I’d leave it in the garage and the battery would die. I had some wonderful cars.

How many cars do you think that you’ve had during your lifetime – since that first pride and joy?

Oh…I think…I would say…50 cars. Yes, 50.

Fifty, that is a great number. What cars do you have now?

The one that I drive, that I cherish and that I love the most is my Smart Car. I love that thing. My wife bought it for my birthday. She surprised me. Because I looked at the Mini-

Cooper. One day I saw a car zooming past and I said to myself, ‘What the hell is THAT?’ Because it looked like a golf cart, like a baby’s shoe, a large baby’s shoe. I remem­ber we then looked for one. It was hard to find because they were on back order. We drove around looking for them and asked, and the manager said these cars are hard to come by. There’s a six-month or a year wait, some­times. He said he’d keep an eye out, and if something came up, he’d call me.

After that, my wife pursued it. So, my birthday came around and we went to Orange County, being as my wife’s mom lives there, and my wife told me that we needed to go by her mom’s house to pick up something. We went by her house, she raised the garage door, I walked in the garage – and the garage is large – but I didn’t notice it sitting behind the trash can because it’s so small! It’s so tiny, she parked it parallel. And I thought, this is my car! I kept it in Laguna, so when we went to Orange County I always had a carto drive. Then I decided that I was going to bring this car to L.A.

I drove it, got off of the exit and on the freeway. I was driving, like, 50 miles an hour because it was so little. I thought I could get blown away by a tractor trailer. I tried it at 60 and I tried 70, then here comes a big truck flying by. The car didn’t move from the burst of wind from the big truck and that surprised me.

Sounds like your Smart Car has excellent grip.

Right. It’s stable. It hugs the road, it’s so low. I got it to 80; I wasn’t supposed to, but I did it because this is my car. I love it. I drive it every day.

What tires do you have on it; maybe the tires helped the car hug the road?

The same tires that come on it – muffin tires. They’re cute tires. The tires are no bigger than on a golf cart, but I love the car.

How many miles per gallon do you get in your Smart Car?

Thirty-five easy, maybe more.

Okay, so you have the Smart Car and what other vehicles do you have…

We have a Tahoe hybrid, and that car is for the kids. We take the kids to school in that car because my kids – and all kids, I think-they don’t believe in keeping a car clean. That’s their car. I love driving my car because, going a long distance with the family, it is a great car. The thing about it is, you don’t know the damned thing is on because you can’t hear it. Sometimes I start it twice, not knowing it is already started. But it’s a great car. I love that car.

So you’re all about the Green Movement.

No question, yeah. I have two cars-two vehicles-that I think benefit the environment.

Would you ever buy another gas-guzzling vehicle after owning the hybrids?

No. That’s my car. The Tahoe hybrid is my car, and my Smart Car.

If you had a dream car that you never pulled the trigger on, what would that be? I know you had the Maserati, the Ferrari and you had the Porsche. Was there ever a certain car that one of your friends has owned that you have desired?

The only car that comes to mind was an Aston Martin. That was a cool car. Didn’t James Bond drive that car?

Yes, the D.B. 9.

Yeah, yeah, I liked that. That is the only car that comes to mind. But I’m kind of past that point now; I’m a Smart Car and hybrid type of person now.

What’s your favorite color combination when it comes to cars?

I like black on black. I like blue with a cream-color interi­or. I like white. My wife doesn’t like white; she thinks it’s too showy, but that is why I like it!

Very crisp, like your Smart Car.

Yes. My Smart Car is white. I like my color combination of my Smart Car – white with kind of a red interior.

What kind of music do you listen to when you’re cruising down the freeway?

My kids laugh at me. I like the oldies, but the goodies. I like Luther Vandross.

Hey, Luther’s good. He’s not an oldie-but-goodie!

My kids have me listening to some of the rap. They like Tl.

Everybody’s into Tl, a lot of the athletes. Tl, Tl!

I also like Johnny Gill. My music is Johnny Gill. Johnny is a very, very close friend of mine and my family. Johnny will come over here and sing, and the kids love it. The kids love his voice.

Yeah, he has a good and grooving voice.

Oh, a great voice.

Have you ever been involved in a car accident?

Yes. Two accidents, to be exact. I was in one back in the late-’60s, with my mom. My mom was driving me and my two little sisters to South Carolina. What happened, it was late at night and she had just gotten off work but wanted to get on the road, and then fell asleep at the wheel and we went off the road and into a ravine. It was frightening. It sends chills up and down my spine when I think about it. You know how big the old jacks were back then?

Yes.

Well, the impact of the crash, when we hit the ravine, sent the jack straight through the trunk and all the way into the back seat of the car. I had just grabbed my little sister and brought her up front. It was awful. Then I had a head-on collision in a Laredo Jeep. What happened, I took a left turn and this guy went, like, BOOM, straight into me. I had contusions and bruises, but you don’t feel the pain until, like, two days later.

Right like the inner bruising that you get from the impact

Yes. It was really, really horrible.

How old were you when that accident happened?

I was probably in my mid-20s.

How old were you when you were in the childhood acci­dent?

I was in my teens -17, or maybe 18.

Do you have any favorite road trips that you like to take? I know you said that you have relatives that live in Orange County, but any driving trips that stick out in your mind?

Yeah. My wife and I like to go to Santa Barbara. It’s a nice drive down the coastline. It’s so beautiful. We also think a beautiful ride is to the Montage along the PCH. That’s a nice ride, and we know the owner of the Montage in Beverly Hills. He is a friend of ours. It is fantastic. Beautiful.

Do you prefer cars or trucks? Do you think that you lean towards one or another?

Well, I do like both. It depends on what the activity or trip is. If it’s a long trip, I like a big truck. If it’s just around the corner, I like the smallest car I can find – or a convertible.

How fast have you ever driven in a street car on the free­way?

The fastest I’ve driven…! drove 100 miles an hour one time because I wanted to see how it felt. I was scared of the police and it is not smart to drive that fast, but I had to do it. I did it for, like, two seconds and it was, uhm. I don’t know if it was a revelation or I got some big feel out of it, but I did it. I had to do it.

What has been your favorite car out of all of the ones that you have owned since you first got your driver’s license? Is there one that sticks out in your mind that you wish you still had?

You know, I truly loved my 280Z.

Oh my gosh, I am a huge Z person. Those are great cars.

There was nothing like it and I remember when I first had that car. To me, from my memory, when I got in that car, especially at night, the dashboard lit up like a cockpit of an airplane.

Yes, the orangish dashboard lights.

All the lights and all the whistles. I loved that car.

I was always a huge Z fan myself. Then they stopped making them in 1996. Then they came out six years later with the 350ZX, which was similar to an Audi TT or the Infinity coupe, so the Nissan Z no longer made a statement

Back in its day and time, it was the sexiest car on the road.

No question. It threw its hair back and said, ‘Look at me, baby.’

It was so cool. To be honest with you, I liked driving it at night because of that orange light.

Was yours an automatic or a stick?

It was an automatic. It was so cool.

What color was it?

I’m thinking it was a cranberry, like a reddish cranber­ry-

Did it have burgundy cloth interior?

It was burgundy! I also remember that car so well because, when I took it to the car wash, it smelled great and was clean. It smelled great, like a strawber­ry!

Sugar Ray Leonard was a genteel, relaxed, awesome man. He was so easy to talk to. To his kids, he’s Papa. He’s a devoted husband to his wife and, surprise surprise, into the Green movement. Here is one of the greatest boxers of all time – wealthy and affluenta happy family man who drives a Smart Carl Go figure. Hard to believe his punch could literally kill a man. He could have been the greatest pound-for-pound boxer of all time. He had the fastest hands and the quickest feet. I’ll never forget this interview. Frankly, when we got to the questions about the cars, it was just like I was talking shop with an old friend.

Advertisements
Standard
athletes, Dallas Cowboys, fast, nascar, ny, sexy, WWE

Barbara Terry interview with Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis has been a golfing phenom since an early age, introduced to the sport before she was five years old. She played her first LPGA event as an amateur at the tender age of 14 and joined the tour as a pro at 18 while attending college. She’s also a part-time model and builds motorcycles with her dad. She has a love of trucks, big cars and classic muscle cars.

What was your first car?

My first car was an ’83 Ford Bronco. It was in college, my second semester. My parents bought me the Bronco.

What color was it?

Navy blue exterior with a tan interior. It was an Eddie Bauer and I loved it. I’ve always liked big trucks and cars.

Was it a full-size Bronco?

Yes. Then, when I turned professional, I bought a Tahoe. A 1999 two-door Chevy Tahoe.

Do you play for the most part now?

Yes, now I just fly. It’s so International. We play more outside the United States than we do inside the United States.

Your two-door Tahoe, did it have a cloth or leather interior?

Cloth. Bright red, big rims, it was really tall. I felt safe in it. I’ve always felt safe in big cars and trucks.

I wondered what happened to it, she seemed to like it so much.

I love those. Great choice.

The next car I bought was on eBay. It was a Harley Davidson truck, a 100th year anniversary truck. I was obsessed with it. It was silver and black. I looked everywhere for it for about four to five months, then found it on eBay. I flew my dad out to Texas and he drove it back to Vegas. I still have it.

That’s awesome!

Yes. This is actually the first car I’ve had, the Lexus you are shooting today. I’ve had trucks for eight years of being professional; I’ve had an Escalade and an Expedition. I would just keep on changing out big cars and big trucks. I would take my car out on the road to tournaments, but now I won’t. Now we have an International schedule. I used to drive to all of the tour­naments, so I always had a big vehicle.

And you sold it?

Yep.

Ouch.

I kind of turn them over. Sell them or give them to fam­ily, but turn them over.

Do you like leasing or owning your vehicles?

Owning.

Because of the equity factor or the fact that the vehi­cle is yours and you can do whatever you want to with it?

So I don’t have to make another payment!

Hi

(LAUGHTER) Yes, that’s a good thing. How old were you when you got your driver’s license?

I was 16. My parents couldn’t afford to get me a car, so I went to college without one. In my second semester, my parents surprised me with a car for my birthday. That was my 18th birthday. I was a freshman.

What do you drive now?

Now I have a Lexus 350is, which is the car you’re shooting today.

Awesome. How long have you had the Lexus?

A few months. I just sold an Escalade and got it.

How well do you like being in a smaller vehicle?

I love it. It’s so fun having a car. I can’t believe how easy it is to buzz around in it.

It’s easier, but different, if you’re used to sitting up high in trucks. It’s a different feeling. When you used to travel going to tournaments, what was your favorite road trip?

My favorite city in the United States is Los Angeles. I’m from Sacramento, California, but I love L.A. I pretty much like driving all over the U.S. I’ve been cross-country, prob­ably, five times. I spent a lot of time on the road. I’ve been on the road since I was 14 playing in tournaments.

Can you drive a stick shift?

Yes. And now the Lexus that I have has the paddle, so I learned how to drive with the paddle shifter. It’s so much easier than a stick. I learned howto drive a stick a couple years ago. I had a TV show on The Golf Channel and my dream car at that time was a Dodge Viper. I said I wouldn’t buy a sports car until I learned how to drive a stick, so my producers on the show surprised me and brought me a Viper for a weekend, and it was a stick. They actually set it up because they wanted to shoot me learning to drive a stick. I drove it around Vegas all week­end, stalling it out. It was fun. That’s how you learn, though. Usually, you don’t learn on a Viper.

So you were grinding the clutch…screeeeeeeech.

Well, I was doing okay. They started to shoot and said, ‘You’re ready’ and started me out going up a hill.

Oh no.

Yeah, a big old hill.

And to learn on a hill is impossible, especially at a stoplight with a car coming up behind you. You feel like, ‘How am I going to do this?’

And I have another car, a ’68 Mustang Fastback that is in showroom condition. I keep at my parents’ house.

I wish we could have shot that! Sweet!

They don’t drive it much, maybe take it to a show if there’s one nearby. I’ve always liked the old classic Mustangs.

Is it all original or has it been restored?

No, it’s been restored and we put some extra bells and whistles on it.

How long have you had the Mustang?

Five years, but I only drive it when I go home to Sacramento. My parents make sure that it’s kept up because I’m not home very much. I’m on the road 90 percent of the time.

How many miles does it have on it?

About 18,000, not many.

What color is it?

Bright red, Ferrari red. I’m going to put white stripes, racing stripes, over the top next time I go home. I used to go to car shows all the time. You go to different cities, you get to see different cars.

Oh, yeah, get different ideas on how to restore clas­sics. What’s your favorite color combination with cars?

I tend to buy black cars over and over again. I like the blue Viper with the white racing stripes. Definitely, the Mustang I’m putting those stripes on, but I’ve tended to buy black cars for the last seven or eight years.

When you were a teenager, before you got your dri­ver’s license, you probably thought about cars and thought, “Wow I’d like this.’ What was that dream car? Was it a Lamborghini, was it a truck with big rims? What really caught your attention?

A white Lamborghini with tan interior where the doors went up. And I thought the Camaros looked like that — had the same slant, and looked like it. I thought one day I could realistically get that when I became a pro golfer, but I didn’t. Then I set a standard and decided that when I won my first tournament, I would buy a Viper. In 2007, when I did (win), I threw a big party, but I’m not home enough to feel I can have a car like that. Maybe one day, when my life slows down a little bit. I go to car shows, and they have great Lamborghinis and Ferraris at the museum here in Las Vegas.

Isn’t there a Ferrari dealership in one of the hotels here?

Ferrari is inside the Wynn and Lamborghini is inside the Palazzo, but I love classic cars. One of the maga­zines I get when I travel is the Du Pont Registry. Many athletes love classic cars. My favorite part of Cribs is when they show the cars.

(LAUGHTER) Yeah, it’s funny. When I started this book, I didn’t want all spectacular cars. I wanted some different cars, like Sugar Ray Leonard has a Smart Car out in LA. He’s driving this little bitty white Smart Car all over Los Angeles, it’s hilarious. It’s cool, though. What about car accidents? Ever had a car accident?

No. No car accidents, no speeding tickets, knock on wood.

No speeding tickets?

Nope, no tickets. I do not think I have ever even gotten a parking ticket.

Have you ever been pulled over and talked your way out of a speeding ticket?

One time. I was on my way to the airport about 4:30 one morning to get on a plane to go play a tournament in Singapore, and the officer said, ‘Natalie, where are you going so fast?’ I told him I had to catch a plane to Singapore and he let me go with a warning.

That was nice of him.

Yes. My management team, I think, currently has an over/under on when I’m going to get a ticket in my Lexus.

Would you ever own a hybrid?

Yes, absolutely. I think the next car I get will be a hybrid. They used to be so small, but now that you have choices. I’ll probably get a Lexus hybrid. They’re beautiful and so quiet.

They’re sweet yes. What kind of music do you listen to when you are driving?

A combination. I like classic rock and top 40. Now that I have satellite and regular FM, I’m always changing. It’s easy with a touch screen.

How many cars do you think you’ve owned throughout your life?

Twelve.

That’s pretty sweet. Have you ever looked at another golfer’s car and thought you might need to get what they have?

No. I never see the other golfers’ cars, but I do see celebri­ties’ cars on TV. All tricked out. I just saw on the last Cribs, Kim Kardashian had a white Range Rover with white seats with pink trim, and pink on the rims iLAUGHTER) ..yeah, but it was custom and it would be nice to have custom stuff.

Leading right into my next question. Speaking of custom, what do you like to modify on your cars when you get them straight from the factory? Is it rims you want first or an upgraded stereo system? What do you find that you’re not happy with completely, as far as factory goes?

I like to upgrade everything. I like it supercharged. I like to change the brakes, put all high-performance stuff on, high-performance tires with the biggest rims that I can fit, but still make manage. I have never had bigger than 22 inches, but I’ve seen them. Definitely leather seats. If I can fit TVs in there somewhere…I’ve always had SUVs, so I had TVs in the back for group travel with a pile of DVDs.

Well, with that you know that they are sitting in the back seat and occupied. They’re entertained while you are driving.

Now, a navigation system. I don’t know how you can travel without a navigation system. I used to have my little Garmin, but now I get navigation systems in the car. Tinted windows. You know, Nevada is more lenient than most states. You can get the windows tint­ed very dark here, but then if you drive that car in California… ticket! You have to be pretty careful, being as different states have different regulations. Now I take off all the logos, too, all except for the one Cadillac symbol. I like a clean look.

How fast have you driven in a car?

Donald Trump let me take his Ferrari out at a tourna­ment a few years ago, and I’d say 150 or 160.

Was that on the Long Island Expressway?

No, it was in West Palm Beach. He’d just gotten a new Ferrari, and for our tour championship, we got to stay at his hotel and we got to play at his golf course. He has beautiful cars, and a friend and I got his car for a night. I’d like to drive on a track once. I know they have a racing track here in Vegas, and I’d like to do that one time. You know, where you can actually take a car out on a track.

If you ever want to go to one of my off-road races, let me know. I’ll take you.

Really? Do they have them here?

Yeah. I just did the Vegas To Reno back in August. The way the course was mapped out it came out to be

What!!!

Yeah. Not on the road, but up in the mountains, on the sides of cliffs doing 80. We raced the Ford Raptor truck, the only Raptor they modified for racing. Off- road is fun, but it’s not very glamorous. If you don’t mind eating dirt for a few days…

Okay, speaking of your Tahoe, it was lifted. Did you put the lift kit on it?

I bought it that way.

What do you have going on right now, or what is your favorite charity?

This year, I got to be on Celebrity Apprentice, which was fun because I got to play for my favorite charity. The Boys & Girls Club. Now that the off-season is here, I have more time to spend here and in Sacramento where my parents live, and I’ll spend more time with the kids here and there. I’ve got great sponsors. My largest sponsor is Addidas. (Others are) Taylor Made, Cannon, Outback Steak House, Mastercard, 24 Hour Fitness, Sky Golf and Winn Grips, which are two golf companies. I do stuff with Addidas Eyewear. I got to design an Addidas shoe for 2010. That was exciting.

That’s cool. When does it come out and where?

In January, I think all over the world. You always have a dream of having a shoe.

(LAUGHTER) Yeah. Why did you choose Vegas?

I chose Vegas because my coach is here. Butch Harmon lives in Vegas. I came across this area of Lake Las Vegas, which doesn’t have the feel of Vegas. You have a man-made lake, beautiful homes and a sense of community. You’re a half an hour away from the strip and anything and everything you could imagine. There’s great concerts, spas, restaurants and shop­ping.

An international airport

Yes. There’s a lot more to Vegas than just the strip. You can go hiking in Red Rock. There’s skiing a half-hour from here.

Great spas.

(LAUGHTER) Yes. I would love to check out every spa in every hotel.

That’d be a book in itself.

Yes. It would make a great TV show. Get paid to do it and order every treatment on the menu.

Tell me about your motorcycle.

One of my favorite toys that I built with my dad is a custom bike. It’s beautiful. It has caricatures of me and my dad, and it is a retro baby blue. They actually had it on display at Treasure Island. They’ve shown it across the country at different motorcycle shows and now it’s at home. One day, I’d like to have a room where you can have it up on display.

You don’t ride it?

No, it’s too beautiful. My dad rides it when my parents come to visit me here in Vegas. It was on display for almost a year on the strip.

That’s neat. Have you ever had a bike you rode a bunch?

No. Being on tour, you cannot really take chances. Yes, you have to be extra careful with the body.

I was excited to meet Natalie knowing that she was not only an accomplished athlete, but a lover of horsepower. She was gracious, sweet and inviting/ A hot lady that knows her cars!


Standard
Dallas Cowboys, fast, Green Bay Packers, Jakell Mitchell, Jessica Chambers, Johnny Manziel, Kobe Bryant, Kourtney Kardashian, Miss World 2014, mumps, nascar, ny, Peyton Manning, sexy, Sydney, William and kate

Barbara Terry interview with Todd Eldredge

Todd won six national championships in his amateur figure skating career. He won a gold, silver and bronze at the World Championships – six medals overall. He’s been to three Olympics and has a successful career on the figure skating circuit. Very accomplished, very impressive. The last thing I expected was the car afi­cionado and racing demon that I met when we got together in sunny Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

What do you currently drive?

I drive a 1996 Ferrari 355 Spider, with 22,500 miles on it.

That is a sporty and stylish piece of machinery. Are you the original owner?

Yes. I bought it in June of 1996, right after I won the World Championship. It was a gift to myself.

Well, you have to spoil yourself, right?

Yeah.

I notice that it is red on a parchment-color interior. Is that your favorite color combination?

When I was a kid, I always wanted a Ferrari – just like every kid that looks at cars wants a Ferrari. And, whenever you think of Ferrari, you think of red. So, if it was going to be my first Ferrari, it had to be red. That is how I decided on red.

Do you think that you are going to upgrade to a newer model?

You know what? This, hopefully – barring anything going wrong mechanically with this car – will be in my stable forever, for so many sentimental reasons.

Do you think you will get an additional Ferrari?

Actually, I did have a 575 for a little while, and decided that one was good enough and two was too many.

(CHUCKLES)

What is the fastest that you have driven on the free­way?

It was in Michigan. I have gotten this Ferrari up to 165, and I think it tops out at about 185… pretty fast.

WOW. Noted. Todd likes speed, that’s pretty fast – faster than most everybody else I’ve interviewed.

Do you have any paintwork on it?

Just some small paint touch-ups from small rock chips, but, other than that, no.

What age did you learn how to drive?

I learned how to drive when I was pretty young. My mom would have my brother and I drive in the neigh­borhood when we were 13 to 14 years old, just to get an idea of how things work. I always just loved driving cars, driving cars around – driving all kinds of stuff, like go-carts. So I was about 13.

He started young, drives fast, has a Ferrari…definitely sounds like a guy that is deeply bitten by the car bug.

What was your first car?

My first car was an Acura Integra. After I won the national championship in 1990, I went on tour and made some money. With that money, I bought myself my own car – to give myself some independence, and get out and do whatever I wanted to do.

What color was the Acura?

It was kinda like a teal bluish/greenish kind of color.

Was it an automatic or a stick shift?

It was a stick shift. It was kind of a bold move on my part because, at the time, I didn’t really know how to drive a stick shift It was one of those jump in with both feet and ya gotta learn.

Let’s see how quickly he adapted to a stick, how mechanically inclined one of the best figure skaters of the past two decades is.

Did you bum the clutch out in it?

Fortunately, I never did. I practiced a little on my dad’s truck before I bought it, then said, ‘Here we go, I will get it, and it is going to be more fun. And I need to learn how to do it anyway.’

What kind of back did your dad have?

I think it was a little Nissan.

Curious, with athletes, music is a way to escape while they drive, watch scenery, sing, whatever. But a figure skater deals with music at the office.

What type of music do you listen to while you are driving out on the freeway?

I think most Ferrari guys would say you do not need to lis­ten to music. You can just listen to the engine.

Listen to the hummm?

Yes! I do listen to music. I love Matchbox 20, Train, all kinds of other music…you name it I have to skate to all types of music, so I am always listening to different stuff to hopefully skate to sometime, or to just enjoy.

No Willie Nelson or Meryl Haggard?

No, not really a lot of country.

What is the craziest thing that you have done in a car?

The craziest thing that I have done in a car… hmmmm…hmmmm. I usually do not get too crazy. The scariest thing that I have done in a car was to back it into a wall at about 80 miles an hour at Sebring Race Track not that long ago. Actually, in a Corvette that I take to the race track. Unfortunately, Corvettes and puddles of water and hydroplaning do not go together. I backed it into the wall, which freaked me out a little bit, but it is all right. No big deal.

Interesting. Yes, Corvettes are built for speed, but are far too light for bad weather and tough roads. Speaking of the Corvette, can you tell me about it?

Sure. I have an ’06 Z06.1 have it all prepped up for tak­ing it to the track. I have it lowered a bit, I have bigger brakes on it, Linginfelter air box, harness bar, racing exhaust and belts. I have all of the bells and whistles on it to take it out, and make sure that I am safe on the track and stuff like that when I go out and have some real fun.

I knew a guy going 170 to 180 miles per hour on the road was a closet race driver. He’s getting ready to go on the track. Interesting. Let’s see if he’s ready to compete against serious competition.

Do you have 600 horsepower in the Corvette?

I have 505, but with what I have in it, it probably puts out about 570 right now.

You seem to really like cars.

Yes. I have had a bunch of cars in my time and I just love them. I am a huge NASCAR fan, and any type of racing that is on TV, I am there watching it. I have Speed Channel on at all times!

If you like racing and speed, you will have to come out to Baja and hang out with my team and I during some of the Baja races.

That is funny. My cousin, Mark Fleming, just started doing photography for some of the off-road rally races. He is up in Maine a bunch. I saw some of his photos and it is pretty cool.

Yeah, you get very dirty in off-road racing.

It is unbelievable, yeah.

Back to his cars. Let’s see if he’s ail power and speed or if he’s into style as well.

What is the color combo on your Corvette?

Black on black. Black is the worst color to try and keep clean, but the best color when it is,. It just looks awesome.

You cannot go wrong with black on black.

Absolutely.

You made a comment that your Ferrari was a gift to yourself. Do you feel that your career influenced your decision in the types of cars that you have rewarded yourself with?

I think it is one of those personal things. Even when I was growing up as a skater, I was always into cars and things, and I was fascinated with racing. When I thought of racing, it was Corvettes and Ferraris. I used to watch all of the racing on TV, Formula 1, and it was always Ferraris. Everyone wants a Ferrari and I said I gotta have it.

But, what if he wasn’t rich and famous? What if he wasn’t ever a competitive skater?

Let’s say that you were a nine-to-five type of a person. What would your car choice have been?

Nowadays, I might have chosen a hybrid, being as you get better gas mileage with something like a hybrid. My cars do not get the best gas mileage.

That leads me to a question that I was going to ask you. Speaking of hybrids, would you ever own one?

You know I probably would. It all depends. If they made a cooler/faster model, I would be all over it. You think of a hybrid and you look at them, and they are not quite as cool. You know they do not make a Corvette hybrid right now…(CHUCKLE) I like fast cars, but, then again, there is the practical side to everything. Maybe when I settle down and have a family and all of that busi­ness, then I would probably think more along those lines. When shuffling the kids out to soccer practice.

(CHUCKLE) So, you’re talking a mini-van?

(CHUCKLE)…Exactly!

How many cars do you think that you have owned throughout your life?

Too many…(CHUCKLE)

Too many nightmares?

Yes…(CHUCKLE)To be honest with you, it would be hard to put an exact number on it. Probably 15, maybe even more. I had an Acura Integra, a Honda Prelude, BMW M3 and a Toyota Supra Turbo.

I see a sporty type of pattern going on here.

I did have a Ford Explorer, a Chevy Tahoe and a Jeep Grand Cherokee for a while. I did have a 1962 Corvette for a while, which was a fun little car, unbelievable. I do not know how the guys that raced them back in the day han­dled them with no power-steering and fighting the wheel the whole time, but they are fun to cruise in.

I had a 1932 Ford Roadster built by Roy Brizio. He has a shop near San Francisco called Brizio Street Rods. I had it built from the ground up and, unfortunately, had to sell it, being as I did not use it much. I decided that I could sell it and let someone else enjoy it and have fun with it. It was fun.

Todd seems to be a speed and racing type guy, and has no practical need for a truck. But he loves vehicles so much, maybe he is a truck guy.

Would you ever own a pick-up truck?

You know, I am sure that I would at some point, maybe to haul my race cars…(CHUCKLE)

We have the Ferrari, the Corvette. Are there any other members currently in the family?

That is all that I have right now. Being in Florida, I typ­ically drive my Corvette every day and bring this baby “Ferrari” out on really nice days. Being down here, there are a lot of those. But, being as the Corvette is in the shop, I am driving my Ferrari,

What I took from our meeting is that Todd gives you every­thing he’s got, all the time. He pushes limits and pushes himself constantly, living life to the fullest. I found out he races a Corvette as a weekend racer, and has an all-con­suming passion and desire to be fast and sporty.

Standard
Dallas Cowboys, fast, Green Bay Packers, Jakell Mitchell, Jessica Chambers, Johnny Manziel, Kobe Bryant, Kourtney Kardashian, Miss World 2014, mumps, nascar, ny, Peyton Manning, sexy, Sydney, William and kate, WWE

Barbara Terry interview with Tony Dorsett

In Dallas and NFL circles, Tony Dorsett is a legend. He was Rookie of the Year in the NFL as a Cowboy, win­ning a Super Bowl his first year after winning the College National Championship the previous year. He was the first guy to break a 99-yard run from scrimmage in the NFL, a record he still shares. He was a four-time Pro Bowler. He’s the only guy ever to win a Heisman, College Championship, Super Bowl and be in both the College and NFL Halls of Fame. Though he ended his career with the Denver Broncos, he’s a Cowboy through and through.


What was your first car?

My first car was a 1960 Dodge. It was one of those hand-me-downs from one of my brothers. We called it “The Blue Goose” because it was a big blue Dodge. I don’t remember what kind of Dodge, but it was a big four-door and I had retread tires on it. Every week, sometimes even twice a week, I’d go and get new retread tires. We were in the projects and did not have a whole lot. The springs would break on it and I had a leak in my break lines. I’ll never forget, one day I was trying to hustle a little. I would stand outside by the bars and these elderly people would come out and they would be kind of stumbling. They’d want a ride home. So I had a little taxi service. I’d give them a ride home and they’d give me a few bucks. Back then, you could buy a whole lot of gas. So that was my hustle.

This one lady I was taking home was getting out of the car real slow and I told her, ‘My brake lines are bad. You gotta get out of the car and shut the door because I cannot stop all of the way!’

One day I was at the top of a hill. It looked like it was flat, so when I get to the top it’s not flat and then my car cut off. So my car is flying backwards down this hill. I’m looking backwards and I’m trying to steer and see where I’m going. As I’m flying down the hill, a lot of the guys in the street thought I was trying to chase them

with my car, so they scattered. It got to the point that I was either going to hit these parked cars or these big cement steps going up to somebody’s house. I had to make a choice and I figured my dad would be pretty mad at me if I hit these parked cars, so I went for the steps. I tore them steps up. And guess what? In that Dodge I only had a dent in my bumper, just about the size of a softball.

How fast do you think you were going down that hill backwards?

Well, it felt like I was going 100 miles per hour! I was so scared. But I was probably only going 25 to 30 miles per hour coming down backwards, and picking up speed. I couldn’t stop.

Well, it’s a good thing the steps were there. Back then, driving the “Blue Goose” around, what was your dream car?

My dream car was a Buick Electra 225. We called it a duce and a quarter. I wanted it so bad because they were nice big cars, and clean. Back in the neighbor­hood, some of the older guys had them and they were really sharp cars back then. All I wanted was the duce and a quarter. But, when I got a chance to get a car, I didn’t get it. I got a big Lincoln Town Car.

What was that first prize possession car that you spoiled yourself with after that first big professional con­tract?

When I first got drafted, I bought a dove gray with bur­gundy interior Lincoln Continental with a big old tire kit on the back of it, with some nice little white-wall tires on it. I had the sunroof top, digging the scene and gangster lean. I was big-time when I got that. Then I finally realized that I really didn’t need those big cars and I started getting into sports cars.

Now we were talking. He ran fast. Figured he’s driven fast, too. What did you start driving?

I went to the Porsche Carrera, black. Then I went to a red Porsche Turbo widebody, and then I went to the Mercedes SL. I went to the SL and the SEL, and since then, I’ve been driving Mercedes.

How many cars do you think you’ve had since the origi­nal “Blue Goose?”

About 14 since “The Goose.”

What’s your favorite color combination when it comes to cars?

My favorite is black on black. When you get a black car and it’s shining and you’ve got some wheels on it, you can’t beat it.

But black on black is ugly when it’s dirty.

It is ugly when it’s dirty, you’re right. They look bad. You gotta keep them clean. That’s why I stopped buying black cars, because it was, like, too hard just trying to keep them clean all the time. When I got this Mercedes I have now, I was in the showroom store down at Park Place Mercedes and I was looking at this one, like, wow. I said peanut but­ter and jelly because it is burgundy on the outside and tan on the inside. I saw it on the showroom floor and I just had to have it. When I first got it, someone was giving me smack about it being ‘Redskins colors.’ I said do not call my car Redskins colors. Do not go there with that. This is peanut butter and jelly!

I don’t drive it enough. I need to drive it more because it’s a real nice car. I don’t know what the horsepower is because I never get caught up in that stuff, but all I know is it runs like a spotted-ass ape. It flies. I was going 120 or something like that and I got a ticket.

So, 120. Is that the fastest that you have driven in a car?

Yeah, pulling some G-force. Buckle up!

Come on now! You didn’t completely open up one of those 911s that you had?

Nope. I don’t like to go so fast. I get scared. I think we’re gonna get a blowout or I’m gonna lose control. When you’re on the field, playing, you are in control of your speed. But you’re subservient when you’re behind a steer­ing wheel. It’s a little bit different when you’ve got machin­ery and you don’t have total control over it. It would be okay if I could push the eject button and fly out if I lose control, but you are at the mercy of not knowing where you’ll end up.

Is there a dream car that you’ve never pulled the trigger on?

Yeah, a Bentley. The reason I haven’t done it is, I was just thinking that I could do more with that money than riding in a Bentley. Like I could buy some real estate. I just have a problem spending that much money for an automobile.

What about motorcycles. Have you ever had a Harley?

If I had it my way, I’d have a bike right now. But my wife and daughters won’t let me. When I was coming out of

college, I was back home messing around with some of the boys, and the boys were talking and hanging out, and a boy came by on a Honda. I always wanted to try one, so I asked to let me try riding it and he showed me how to do it. When I was driving, I just happened to close my eyes and squeeze, and I hit the hand brakes. I got in a panic because I was losing control. When you’re losing control, you grip down. When you grip, that’s the problem.

That was my first time, so after that, I went and bought me a bike. I got a Kawasaki 750. I’ll never forget that first bike. I go to the Kawasaki place and we’re up there and they have this little trail where you can ride the bike. That was a lot more power than the Honda, so I didn’t know if I should do it. The guy told me I’d handle it real good. One of my friends I played ball with kept telling me I should get it. So I got the bike and I almost never ended up playing ball again. I was on campus one time and everybody was out there in the yard. I would go out and get on my bike and I’d try to show off a little bit. I took off again and, like I said, when you panic, you grip, and I gripped the handles. In Pittsburgh, we have Fourth Avenue, which goes down like a four-lane street. And we have Fifth Avenue. I was on the Fifth Avenue side and I took off, trying to show off, and I panicked and I gripped. We had a bunch of cars just parked along the street because it’s the city and I turned just at the right minute. If I just would’ve gone a little further, I would’ve gotten hurt. I liked them, though, and I kept riding them. When you see people popping wheelies and driving down alleys they’ve lost respect for the bike. Those are the people you’re gonna see caught in a ditch somewhere or get hurt someday – really bad – because they don’t respect the bike.

It was a part of the NFL contract, riding motorcycles is a no-no. There was this guy on a team who had a bike and he ended up getting hurt Fie went to the playoffs and didn’t get any playoff money. That didn’t worry me too much, that part of it, but what worried me was the fact that going down the highways, the bike was kind of quiet. I changed the pipes on the sucker to let them know I’m coming because I know myself that there’s some blind spots in your mirrors. I’ve almost hit cycles a few times. I’ve kind of drifted away from bikes.

So, what is on your car’s radio while you are cruising around town?

ESPN.

Interesting. All those years in pro sports, you’re a big sports talk radio guy?

I love sports. I do. I don’t really listen to a lot of sports radio anymore, but I’m an old-school guy. I got a lot of old- school music in my car. I listen to some nice jazz on the radio and that kind of stuff. I’m not into all of the hip-hop rap stuff. I’m not really into a whole lot of that.

How old were you when you got your driver’s license?

I was 16 when I got my license. My first driving experi­ence, me and my friend had these girls we were dating. One of my oldest brothers ended up giving me the ‘Blue Goose.’ We were trying to take them back home and they were doing their thing, trying to play cards back there, down at the playground and stuff. I told them they needed to take these girls back home and he gave me the keys and said, ‘Here, take them.’

How old were you?

I was, like, 14.

Was that the first time you were ever behind the wheel?

Yeah. My first time behind the wheel. I almost tore that thing up. We were kind of sneaking with these girls. We were taking them back and we thought it was their par­ents or something that got behind us, and we were taking off. We were on roads I’d never been on in this big old Dodge. We were rolling, but I was scared to death. We were almost hit because some of those back roads had those mailboxes that looked like sawed-off telephone poles. I almost hit seven of those. That was my first driving experience and, from then, on it was smooth sailing.

Is that your favorite car of all time or was there one of those 911s, maybe, that was your favorite? Let’s say, when you’re thinking about all the cars that you had. what car do you think brings the biggest smile to your face?

The ‘Blue Goose.’

Because of all the funny stories, right?

Yeah. But now I appreciate my S550 more so. The SL500 was a nice car, my Porsches are nice-looking, but when you’re in traffic, I’m, like, enough of this. It used to hurt the bottom of my foot, using the clutch so much. I like this Mercedes sedan, ‘Peanut Butter and Jelly.’ I do.

Do you have anything going on in your life right now that you want to talk about like a charity?

I have a great charity going on right now called the McGuire Memorial Foundation. I’ve had a golf round every year for the last 17 years in the Pittsburgh area. It’s called the McGuire Memorial Foundation Tony Dorsett Celebrity Golf Outing. It’s for special-needs kids. When we started this thing, we had about 98 kids in the home that couldn’t walk or talk. It’s supported by the state and we have the nuns that run it up there. It’s a bad situation from the kids’ perspective, but it’s a great charity because it touches a lot of people. I tell my sponsors that, to understand my passion, you just need to take a trip to the home. If you take one trip to that home, it’ll cause something to touch you and you’re going to wanna do anything you can, whatever you can, for that home and those kids.

Do you have any favorite road trips that stick out in your mind, either as a kid or right now?

It wasn’t in a car. I had rented a 40-foot tricked-out RV last summer for a two-week trip. It was my oldest daughter’s last summer with us because she’s gonna be going to school at Oklahoma State in June for bas­ketball. We were on the road and we met up with them in Kentucky, and we went to South Carolina, up to Pittsburgh. Then we came back up through the Virginia area. We had my nephew and he drives 18- wheelers, so he was helping me drive on the way back. It was my wife, my daughters, one of my daugh­ter’s teammates, and we were rolling.

That is fun stuff. Are you going to hit the road again in an RV?

Oh, I loved it, especially with family because it’s so much quality time and time to get reconnected. When you’re in an RV, you have everything there. We cooked a bunch of food and had a refrigerator. You have the restroom, you have everything set. It’s like a house on wheels, so you get to spend a lot of quality time with your family. It’s really great. You do what you want to do, you travel how you wanna travel. If you wanna stop in this town, you can stop in this town. We did one before. We went down to Myrtle Beach and had a fun time. But we stayed at the beach too long. We were gonna come back through Arkansas and take them to the presidential libraries and everything up in Arkansas, and go to Hot Springs, but we couldn’t do it because we stayed at the beach too long.

That gives you something to do on your next RV road trip!

But next time I wanna go west. I’ve been east twice. Now I wanna go west.

Having grown up in Dallas, I was very honored to meet Tony. What I found was a very nice, gentle man who was relaxed and very interesting. I first met him at a Cowboys playoff game that Too Tall Jones had treated me to inside an amaz­ing suite at the new Cowboys Stadium. After we inter­viewed him and took his photos, we grabbed some lunch with him at one of his favorite Cajun restaurants.


Standard
Dallas Cowboys, fast, Green Bay Packers, Jakell Mitchell, Jessica Chambers, Johnny Manziel, Kobe Bryant, Kourtney Kardashian, Miss World 2014, mumps, nascar, ny, Peyton Manning, sexy, Sydney, William and kate, WWE

Barbara Terry interview with Jay Cutler

Jay Cutler is a 274-pound statue of muscle who is the IFBB’s most recognized athlete. Jay was 2006, 2007 and 2009 Mr. Olympia, and the 2002,2003 and 2004 Arnold Classic Champion. He is a well-known speaker and motivator, and is one of the most popular bodybuilders that the world has known, perhaps since the days of Arnold Schwarzenegger.

What was your first car?

It was a 1981 Toyota Corolla. It was like a maroon color. I had that car when I was 14 and I actually was able to register and insure that vehicle I just didn’t have a driver’s license until I was 16.1 grew up on a farm in Massachusetts with over 100 acres of land, so I was able to learn howto drive early and I pretty much was able to drive myself around.

That’s pretty cool. Was it an automatic or a stick?

It was an automatic. It was a two-door. It had some rust on it, but it was sufficient for a first car. It was just a vehicle to drive around, at that point. I remember when the imports penetrated into the States and how much of a splash they were because they were so dif­ferent than the big Buicks or the Cadillacs that every­body had. But they were really good cars.

What did you buy after that?

I actually bought a Mazda RX7, which was a real sporty car. I bought that when I was 16. I had pretty much the best car at my high school. I made good money when I was a teenager, working at my family’s concrete business. I always had a passion for nice cars and that was my first sporty car. My dream was to actually buy a Corvette, but I had to settle for the RX7 first.

Did you ever get that Corvette?

Yes, I did, actually. I got a Corvette in 2000 – a green Corvette convertible-when I moved to California. And

I had a 740 BMW and then I had a 750 BMW, both at once. I had trucks, I had a Toyota Land Cruiser. I won these two Hummer trucks in a competition. I’ve gone through three H2 Hummers, a Mercedes Benz SL500 convertible; I still have four cars now. I had Jaguars, Porsches; I pretty much run the gamut.

Is there a dream car that you have yet to buy for your­self?

I always wanted a Porsche Carrera GT, which runs around $400,000. It’s just too much right now. I can’t fit in it. I’m limited in what I can drive. That’s the problem with being a bodybuilder that weighs 300 pounds. I drive bigger cars like the S Class Mercedes that I have now. I have two BMW trucks that I drive and a con­vertible 6 series BMW. I always have had Porsche Cayennes and I had that Porsche Turbo 911, but it was too small and the Corvette was even too small for me. I think my next vehicle I’m looking at is a Rolls Royce Phantom, which is a big four-door. It’s huge. I like the white exterior on a cream interior.

Wow. That’s a pretty car.

Yeah, I know. For me, a lot of my cars are tricked out because I put a lot of my cars in big car shows here in Las Vegas, like the SEMA show. I put my cars in the shows just as celebrity cars, and that kind of stuff, because I get all sorts of stuff for my cars. So a lot of my cars are pimped out. I’ve got the big wheels and the chrome and all of that stuff.

You mentioned, on that Phantom, that you wanted a white on cream interior. What’s your favorite color combina­tion?

Probably silver and black because I’ve had a Porsche 911 that was silver exterior with a black interior. I have a Mercedes now, which is silver with black interior, a 7 Series BMW, which was silver and black. I also like the blacked-out look. They call it the ‘murdered out’ black, where you have the taillights dark – smoke black – the wheels are black and the whole exterior’s black. The inte­rior’s black and the windows are tinted black. Here in Vegas, you obviously want the windows tinted, so all my cars are pretty heavy tinted. Actually, all my cars, except the Mercedes, are black.

When you gained the first success with your career and you had some gravy type money, what was that car you went out and bought yourself?

Once I started making money successfully, probably about

  • bought the 7 Series BMW. I lived in Massachusetts, so I couldn’t really have a sporty car because the weath­er was so horrible. My next splurge was the Corvette when I moved to California, because of the weather. You could travel with the convertible top. That eventually lead to me buying more BMW trucks. I never really splurged because of making money, but I guess I started buying the Porsche vehicles when I started doing very well. Those are a little bit more expensive. I have a hard time spending a ton of money on vehicles because they just depreciate so quickly, but some, I do have to have.

When you were a kid, did you ever have a car poster on the wall or did you have a particular dream car?

Every kid has posters of, like, Ferraris and Lamborghinis and stuff, but those cars are, for me, not really practical because I can’t fit in half of them. They’re nice to look at, but they’re not that fun to drive. I mean. I’ve driven everything between Ferraris and Lamborghinis, and they’re not real fun to drive. In my opinion, it’s like you’re whipping around and you can’t really go many places comfortably. If you want to go with a group of people – and I travel a lot with an entourage – you can’t really carry more than two peo­ple in a sports car.

Do you have any motorcycles? I don’t know if I could even picture such a muscular guy on a bike, but I had to know.

I did. Actually, I had some custom Harley Davidsons, I had a Japanese motorcycle. I have two ATVs still in my garage because I was a big fan of ATVs when I was a kid. I don’t get to ride them that often.

You said you have two ATVs in your garage? What kind are they?

I have a Yamaha 700 CC ATV and then I have a Polaris 500, which is real nice and like brand new.

How fast have you driven in a car?

One-hundred sixty.

That’s up there. Where was that?

On the freeway going by the strip here in Vegas.

That’s pretty cool. What driver’s seat were you in?

I was in a Porsche 911. I’ve actually done 150 in my Porsche Cayenne truck. That has 550 horsepower.

Are there any favorite road trips you had as a kid? You mentioned you grew up in Massachusetts; did you guys ever drive down to New York or up to Vermont? Anything that really kind of sticks out in your mind?

I drove to Old Orchard Beach a lot, which is in Maine. From where I lived, that was pretty much straight high­way and it took two hours. I had a Jeep at the time we did that, and I used to take the top down. I used to drive every week to see one of my nutritionists down there. I would enjoy it because it was right along the beach. You have the top down on the vehicle and the weather’s nice. It’s always great

Was that a Jeep Wrangler?

Yes. It was a 1991. That was, I think, my third vehicle. I bought that when I was in college.

What type of music do you like to listen to you when you’re driving?

I’m a rock and rap music guy. That’s mostly what I lis­ten to. I have both on my iPod and CD player. I make the trip to California a lot because I live between LA. and Vegas. That’s a four-hour trip down the freeway, so I do listen to a lot of music, especially satellite radio and iPods and CDs because, obviously, you lose signal halfway through the desert. That’s a nice ride. Usually, after 11 o’clock at night, there’s barely any traffic, so it’s just a straight shot.

What has been your favorite car from the get-go that you’ve had?

Probably one of the Porsches. There’s nothing that drives like a Porsche.

Nothing that sounds like a Porsche, either.

Yeah. I mean, the BMWs are nice, too. I’ve had, like, 10 BMW vehicles in the last six or seven years and I actually keep going back. I like to drive them.

What do you think of Hybrids and would you ever own one?

I would if I lived in L.A. full-time because the traffic’s just ridiculous, and the price of gas. You get certain benefits by having a Hybrid.

At what age did you really know, without a doubt that you were going to pursue bodybuilding?

I picked up my first magazine when I was 12 years old and I saw a picture of Mr. Olympia – Chris Dickerson. I remember telling my older brother – I’m the youngest of seven children -1 said this is how I want to look. I studied the magazines for years and I started weight- training when I was 18. I joined the gym around my 18th birthday. I played sports in high school. I played track and football. I started weight-training when I started college around my 18th birthday, in August of 1991. That was the beginning of my quest to become the best bodybuilder on the planet. I trained all the way through – nonstop – until I won the ultimate title at 33 years old. I became the 11th Mr. Olympia, which is the title of bodybuilding. I held that title for two years – ‘06 and ’07 -and then I lost in 2008.1 fell to second and then I came back to win victory this past September… to rewrite history and become the first Mr. Olympia that ever was defeated and came back to win the title.

That’s great!

I’m now the three-time return Mr. Olympia, so I’ll be going for my fourth title this year.

How much can you bench press?

I think, 550 pounds.

So, basically, you could bench press a dirt bike, literally. That would be a great photo! Have you ever had any car accidents that stick out in your mind?

Fortunately, I’ve never been in a serious wreck. When I was five years old, I was put through the windshield of a vehicle due to a drunk driver. Two accidents I’ve been in were due to a drunk driver. I was hit again in 2005 by another drunk driver. I’ve sustained no injuries except some back problems. That was it. I’m fully recovered from that.

Have you ever looked at one of your competitor’s cars and said, ‘You know what? I need to get me one of those.’

Not really, because I could buy anything I want to pur­chase. I look at what is feasible and practical for me. It’s kind of one of those things, like, why have all these vehi­cles and have to pay for registration and insurance and all this stuff when I never get to drive, being as I travel so

much. One car I’ve had for six years, I’ve only put 8,000                ;

miles on because I don’t drive that much. I, basically, only drive to the gym and the grocery store, and that’s it.

Do you have any favorite charities?

I’m involved heavily with the Make-A-Wish Foundation in Los Angeles. I do charity training camps. What happens is,

once a month, starting at the beginning of the year, I usually have one weekend where people fly in to train with Jay Cutler. They pay a fee to workout with me and half the i proceeds go to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. I wait until June to start training for the Mr. Olympia competition.

What all do you have going on for this next year?

I’m working on a film career now. I want to be an action guy in films. I have a contract in hand to start some filming this year before the Mr. Olympia compe­tition. So I think my next journey will start this year. I have a challenge in becoming the best bodybuilder in the world. That’s been my passion since I was 12 years old. You’ve gotta realize that life, to me, is overcoming obstacles and completing challenges. The challenges and obstacles give us a feeling of self-esteem and I feel that that’s kind of a key to life-to have challenges and obstacles to overcome. Otherwise, there’s really no pride and no reason to live, to feel good about your­self and giving yourself a sense of security. My chal­lenge was to become the best bodybuilder and I’ve won that multiple times. Now I think I’m ready for my next challenge.

And that would be in film, right?

Yes.

Do you see any parallels between Arnold Schwarzenegger’s career and yours?

Well, we have a lot of similarities. He comes from a small area and I come from a town of 6,000 people. I’m an American citizen from the beginning. We both had passions in bodybuilding and he became a real com­petitor. I mean, that’s how I am, too. I’m heavily involved in competing and that’s why I moved here, actually. My passion is to be Mr. Olympia and he’s won it seven times.

I want to be my own man and not necessarily follow in his footsteps, but I see that he kind of opened the path for that. A lot of films, now, are becoming animated, with all of these special effects and more cartoon-like action stars that aren’t real. You look at the Hulk and they have an animation of the Hulk. It’s not like a human body type anymore. People still want to see the action guys, these buff guys, I mean, what it repre­sents is fighting skills and power and that kind of stuff. I think that’s why we’re so interested in the Schwarzenegger films, Steven Seagal films, Jean- Claude Van Damme and Sylvester Stallone, with the Rocky films, and with all that kind of stuff. No matter what any guys say, they would love to be in shape – maybe not to be as big as I am now, but they do like the muscle look, the tough guy look.

Well, you’ve already made your own history, so everything you do from this point on is just going to add to all your greatness.

Well, that’s the whole thing. The problem is that I’m a big celebrity in a small arena because not many peo­ple follow the sport of bodybuilding. It’s not as main­stream, obviously, as wrestling or UFC or other fighting stuff. I’m very popular when I walk the streets. I’m noticed everywhere and a lot of athletes and celebri­ties know me because of magazines. Obviously, we stand out. When I come into a club, I stand out with my physique. I think people take notice with that. So I’m just trying to capitalize on it and move forward and bring something that’s unique.

I found Jay to be exactly what you might expect from some­one billed as bodybuilding’s best personality. He was affa­ble, easy to get along with and very personable. He knew quite a bit about cars and has owned and maintained quite an incredible selection. Jay showed up to our interview and photo shoot in his amazing BMW that was previously owned by Gladys Knight. I look forward to seeing him at the movies!

Standard
Dallas Cowboys, fast, Green Bay Packers, Jakell Mitchell, Jessica Chambers, Johnny Manziel, Kobe Bryant, Kourtney Kardashian, Miss World 2014, mumps, nascar, ny, Peyton Manning, sexy, Sydney, William and kate, WWE

Barbara Terry interview with Dexter Coakley

Dexter Coakley is a 10-year veteran of the NFL, playing linebacker for eight years with the Dallas Cowboys and two years with the St. Louis Rams. Dexter went to three Pro Bowls during his career, posting 438 tack­les, 9.5 sacks and 13 interceptions. Today, he is a successful businessman involved in many ventures, and who is happily retired. For the better part of a decade, he was one of the more feared linebackers in the game, playing at the tail-end of a dominant run by the Cowboys as one of the better teams in the league.

So, Dexter Coakley, what was your first car?

Wow..my first car, actually, was a Ford Grenada. It was just something my dad gave me, something I had in high school. We called it, uhm, there was a nick­name I had, you know, with some of my home boys – FORD, F-O-R-D, For Only Rock Daddy – because that was my nickname, Rock. They just added Daddy at the end and that is what they called it when they would see my Ford Grenada come through. But, yeah, it was a maroon Ford Grenada.

How old were you when you got your driver’s licence?

I really don’t know. I mean, to be honest, because I’m a country boy, you know. I’m not familiar with the city, but, in the country, you learn to drive. Literally, your parents will say, ‘Hey, you know, go drive’ and you learned to drive. I was driving on the highways, prob­ably before I got my license, so, you know, obviously that’s not good, breaking the law. We didn’t have to worry about cops, so we literally learned to drive on the back roads of the neighborhood. I became legal, I think, at 16, but I was driving since I can remember.

Yeah, cool thing about growing up in a small town, I mean, you can start driving on roads as a youngster because even the cops are your siblings’ friends, you know what I am talking about? It’s really like one big family, so, yeah, you wouldn’t get in trouble.

What did you buy after the Grenada?

When I went off to college I ended up with a Datsun hatchback, but it had both names on the car. It was a Datsun Nissan because they were in a transition year. I forget what year it was, I forget how old the car was, but it was a yellow two-door hatchback. It had the Datsun on one side and the Nissan on the other side. Another old car, but it was actually a five-speed, so that was better. I was actually shifting gears and I loved it. I would go up and down the mountain and I would rev it up.

I would go back home on weekends, and one week­end I was heading home and I was on a back road coming out of the mountains in North Carolina. I start­ed shifting my gears, but I was flying, trying to get home, and I tried to pass a car. I pulled down into the left to try and pass him because, you know, one-way traffic either going or coming. I jumped out and I don’t know if I had the clutch all the way in. I tried to put it in fifth gear. I don’t know if I had it all the way up there and it came back out. It just started clanking down and I realized I lost my fifth gear. Well, fifth gear is just overdrive anyways, but I was driving for at least four hours, so I wanted that overdrive. I could just kind of cruise on in. I tried to put it back in fifth and every time I put it back up there, it would just jump back out. I was, like, wow, you know. Must have been a sprocket or something, you know, that didn’t hold the shift into fifth. I would still use it, but I had to hold it up there, which I didn’t want to do. So my five-speed became a four- speed and I had to live with that. It was a piece of junk but, you know, when you’re in college and you have a car, I mean, everybody loves you. Great gas mileage. My room­mates, everybody, wanted to hang around me because we could get off campus. Hey, let’s go to Charlotte, North Carolina or let’s go to Winston-Salem or let’s go to Greensboro or let’s go back to Atlanta. Let’s go to Daytona and Florida. Let’s ride. We didn’t care what it was.

When you got signed with your first paying contract what was the first car that you went and spoiled yourself with?

It was a Ford Eddie Bauer Expedition. That was the first vehicle I bought when I got my contract. That was actual­ly the first time I owned a new car. I mean, it had the new smell in it; it wasn’t a used car that my dad gave me, which I’m not complaining about because they got the job done, but a new car, paid cash.

I wondered where that led to today.

And what do you have today?

I have a Ford pick-up truck – F150 – and my ’64 Super Sport Impala.

Ooooooooh. Now we were talking. Muscle cars.

How long have you had the SS?

It has been years. I mean, I’ve had two and I sold one. I bought one – canary yellow with black interior – a ’64 SS Impala. I bought it from a guy who was from up North and I never actually got a chance to look at the car with my spotter. When I saw it, I thought it was a nice car and my spotter wasn’t able to be there with me. I didn’t do the tests or see if it had any rust on it. I made the purchase just off the rim, you know. I said I like it, let me have it because it was cheaper for me to just have him put the car on a trailer and bring it down because he was actually headed to Amarillo, Texas to show someone else a Corvette. So it was cheaper to pay him to put the car on the trailer, bring it down to Texas and let me have a look at it as opposed to buying airline tickets for my spotter and for myself to go up there just to take a look at the car.

After my spotter finally got a chance to look at it, like if I wanted something just to drive, it was okay for that, but I wanted more of a parade queen. I wanted a car that had matching numbers, you know, just to ride as a float in a parade, no stories. I lucked up and my spotter found the one I have now. It took a while to buy the car from the owner; I didn’t want any part of the transaction. I said ‘Hey, when he’s ready to sell, you go get it and bring it back and we’ll do what we need to do,’ because the guy didn’t want to sell it. In cases like that, I mean, he was going through a divorce and I think his wife had taken pretty much every­thing he had. He didn’t want her to get anything else and he loved the car. He didn’t want to sell the car, didn’t want to part ways with it, he had the car actually put up. I bought the car; it hadn’t been registered since 1978. It took me a while to get the car registered because the bank that he bought the car from was no longer in existence. Luckily, he had a letter from the bank because they want­ed to make sure the car didn’t have any leans or anything on it. I took that to the DMV and that was valid, and they were able to see that the car didn’t have any leans on it. This was a legit purchase. One day he wanted to sell it, and we’d go there and he’d say,’No, I don’t want to sell it.’ I mean, my spotter went there and this is what this guy does for a living. He owns a Chevy auto shop. He has a lit­tle trailer that he put together that he transports cars on.

He showed up one day to go pick up the car and the guy said, ‘Where are you going with that piece of junk?’ My spotter said, ‘What do you mean? This is a trailer. I’m coming to pick up the car.’ The guy said, ‘You’re not putting my car on that thing.’ And my spot­ter says, “What do you mean? I transport cars on this all the time.’ And the guy goes, ‘No, I’m not selling it. Leave, go!’

Richard calls and says, ‘Dex, we didn’t get it.’ I said, ‘You know what, Richard? The next time I want to hear from you is when you’re on the highway with the car on the trailer and you’re coming my way. Make it hap­pen.’ Because the guy, he was fearful. I mean, he didn’t want to see his car torn apart. Long story short, it is now in my driveway.

At any time, have you ever looked at a teammate’s car and went, ‘Oh, I’ve got to get me one of those. I have to have that car?’

I’ve always been in awe with the fast sports car. Larry Allen would always come with Ferraris. It was just a sight to see this big guy squeeze himself into a Ferrari. The only one I didn’t see him with was the Enzo. I mean, he had them all. And it was always envy, like when I would walk past I’d ask, ‘When will you let me drive it?’ ‘Get the keys man, whatever.’ But I never got into it because it was Larry Allen. He was always in a Ferrari. Then he showed up one day with a Bentley and it just didn’t look right. It was a big sedan back then. People didn’t drive coupes like we do now. I liked the Bentley, but he didn’t. It was difficult for him because he just liked that speed. So he would lea ve the Bentley at home most of the time. Sometimes you would see him drive to the plane in a suit and his Bentley, but most of the time it was a Ferrari out there. I don’t know the names of them, but seems like every couple of months it would be a different one. I don’t know the numbers, but he had a Porsche and, wow, I mean that was nice. One day it would be a Spider, the next day it would be a 360. Never had the Enzo.

But, hey, when you have a Ferrari, I don’t care, you have a Ferrari. One day he totalled one of them and the next week he showed up with another one. It wasn’t a devastating accident where he got hurt, but Ferraris, just a fender ben­der, I mean, they’re not big cars. The car was totalled, and then he showed up with another one. Keyshawn had a Cayenne, I think. He had the yellow 911 when he came here. But Dat Nguyen, he got himself a 911 turbo just this last week. Ouch! That is a fast car. I dream about them. My wife tells me to get one, but I just can’t bring myself to it. It’s a big investment.

Speaking of speed, how fast have you driven in a car?

I’m scared. I love speed, but I’m scared. To be honest, I know I’ve gone over a hundred, but when I get around a hundred, it depends who I’m with. If it’s just me, hey, pull back some. I’m like a sprinter. I like 40-yard dashes. I don’t want to go a mile just wide open. I can’t take it. I used to go to tracks all the time and watch those funny cars in the Carolinas. Me and my home boys would go to the tracks all the time and watch them.

It’s just something that’s ingrained when you get into the NFL There are just things you can’t do because, what if something happens and it’s not on the football field. You terminate your contract, you go a hundred miles an hour and something happens, you know. It’s a non-football related injury, so if something goes wrong and they can prove it, it’s like, wow, you don’t want to go and now you can’t play anymore or you’re going to miss a season because you totalled a car. You get broken bones and the team can’t count on you anymore. I was always afraid of that, like skiing and all that stuff. Can’t do any of it. You’re afraid to break a leg and get a non-football related injury, and you’re stuck without a job and they don’t have to pay you. It’s for the team, but it was mostly for myself.

Do you have a dream car that you have your sights on?

I like the Impala, but my dream car is a Pontiac GTO. If I could get my hands on one of those, I could just close up shop. I’d put up my Impala for that GTO. I probably wouldn’t drive it anymore if I could get my hands on a GTO. Right now, I’m still looking. I ran into several, but they’re just too expensive right now and people don’t really want to sell them. Then you have to be careful. You don’t want to get a clone, to get a car that looks like a GTO but then it’s not. If I get my hands on a GTO, it’s over.

Are you okay with this whole NFL retirement thing?

I miss the locker room, but I don’t miss the game. It was great to me, but, you know, the bumps and bruises. I don’t miss that, but that’s part of it. It’s not the game itself, it’s the boys. Little things like seeing how the guys are going to dress when they come to the plane, you know. Back when I first came to the league, Michael and Deion, they come on the plane with one suit, but then they have another suit in the bag. You never really saw them in the same thing twice. You know, you miss that kind of stuff – your teammates, you’re on the plane, you’re flying to these different places and you’re hanging out, going to different places and restaurants. That’s what you miss, you miss the excitement. But as far as playing it, you know when you play a physical part of the game, which I did, I don’t miss it. You know, I had planned to play the game for 10 years and then leave it and still be able to walk. I saw Earl Campbell about six years ago and it’s not a pretty sight. And he was much better back then – six years ago – than he is now. For me, what I desire is still there and it’s burning, you know. I don’t want to say walk away from it, but you have to think of life afterwards as well. When you look at Emmitt, he was able to preserve his career; he didn’t take a lot of punishing blows like Earl did. Earl, when he played, they ran him probably 40 times a game and it was bruising. When Emmitt came, it was more finesse, get down, turn your body, don’t let this guy hit you. It’s still a pounding that your body gets and I don’t miss that. I miss the guys and the locker room. I miss the things we did together as a team.

With Dexter, what I found was a very relaxed, personable, laid-back family man. He was a blast to talk shop with. He is a true class act and, of course, a retired player for my favorite team…the Dallas Cowboys!



Standard
Dallas Cowboys, fast, Green Bay Packers, Jakell Mitchell, Jessica Chambers, Johnny Manziel, Kobe Bryant, Kourtney Kardashian, Miss World 2014, mumps, nascar, ny, Peyton Manning, sexy, Sydney, William and kate, WWE

Barbara Terry interview with Rod Brind’Amour

Rod Brind’Amour is a 21-year veteran center in the NHL. Over the years he’s played for the St. Louis Blues, followed by the Philadelphia Flyers and finally the Carolina Hurricanes, where he’s won a Stanley Cup and two Selke trophies for being the NHL’s top defensive center. He’s scored more than 1,000 points in his career and has logged almost 1,000 penalty minutes, so he’s a scorer and a bruiser. In fact, on the bruiser front, Rod is widely known as Rod the Bod for his prolific workout regimen. I can testify that he, indeed, lives up to his name. He is in exquisite shape and it’s probably why he’s been able to excel for 21 years in the meat grinder known as professional hockey.

What was your first car?

Back in the day, I had an IROC. I was just signed with St. Louis. Back when they were sorta okay, a bur­gundy one with T-tops. I only had it a year before I got rid of it. I was 18 and bought it with my own money, so it felt pretty good.

You must have paid cash for it, right then and there.

Yes. I then had a Cadillac Allante, a Mercedes CLK and a Dodge Durango – when I first started having kids – that I really liked. I also had an old beat-up Jeep that was great to take to the lake. I also just sold a Harley in December 2007 that I had, because, since I got it in only put 2,000 miles on it. I never took time to ride it. It just sat in my garage and some guy came by and made me an offer that I could not refuse, so I sold it.

Can you drive a stick shift?

Yes. I remember my dad had a Volkswagen – a beat- up Volkswagen – when I just turned the age to drive, and we took it to the mill. It was painted white. It looked like Herbie, the Love Bug. He bought it from a teenager. It was all souped up. Looking back on it, I wish we would have kept it because it was cool at the time. That was how I learned to drive. The clutch was hard to operate and would grind pretty bad.

Do you prefer to own or lease your vehicles?

I own, but I really do not care. It really makes no differ­ence. I do like to trade them out. My Honda Ridgeline that I currently drive is brand new, but I had the ’06 and it is the exact same car…they did not change anything on it, but I just got a newer one because I like them. I kinda like the idea of changing them out to keep them new.

Speaking of the Ridgeline, I noticed that you have low-profile tires on it. Was that your choice?

That is funny. The old one I had was just plain. When I got the new one, I was driving by a wheel place, just pulled it in right, and literally walked in there and said, ‘What do we got here. Just make this look a little sharper. I do not want chrome ones because I want something a little different.’ You have been in those shops, I am sure. Everything looks pretty cool. So the salesperson, of course, rolls them out and sticks them on the front of my Ridgeline. I go, ‘Woo,’ and told him to just put those on. It sharpened it up a little, for fun.

Are you happy that you made the choice of the low- profiles or do you feel that it was a spur-of-the- moment decision?

No, I am happy with it because it looks nicer…it adds a little touch to it instead of being totally plain, like what I have had before. Do you think it looks silly, because the guys on the team were giving me a hard time at first. I get a lot of grief. The other guys on the team are telling me that I have to step it up. We have the worst park­ing lot in the league. Every time we pull into the team’s parking lot in other towns, we see what other teams are driving. The other guys on the team say our parking lot looks bad because of my truck. The rims and the tires are the end of the road as far as modifications to the Ridgeline.

Are the other teammates jealous of your Ridgeline?

You’d be surprised how many guys get into the Ridgeline with me. I show them how simple it is and they like it.

Wow, were you able to still go on your trip?

The funny thing was, I was all packed up. I ended up going and dealt with getting the truck fixed later. So, on my whole trip, I had to climb out my doors that were all smashed up. The Ridgeline had obvious damage, but the construction guy’s truck was toast.

Would you ever see yourself buying a hybrid?

If they made a Ridgeline hybrid, I probably would. I am all about better efficiency and the Green movement. I think, in the future, most all cars will be hybrid.

Simplistic is good.

I think that I have told you before that I have had nice cars. I do not know what it is, if you have kids, you need a vehi­cle that can take a beating. I do not care if the kids spill stuff, drop cookie crumbs or ding it up. It doesn’t matter. If you are driving something real nice, you kind of have the tendency to be more particular about it. Bottom line…the Ridgeline gets me where I need to go.

If utility is what you’re looking for, then you’ve done well. Good choice on the Ridgeline. It will last you a lot longer than a lot of the other cars would have.

Cars, to me, are functional, when, to a lot of the guys, it is ‘their thing’… ‘their statement.’ When I had a nice car, the statement that it made did not feel right. I am so much more comfortable in something that is down-to-earth and what I need it for.

Now I wanted to find out more about him. He was so straight­forward and easy to talk to. I wanted to find out what made him tick, what turned him from this laid-back guy into No. 17.

Okay, Rod, what is the most interesting thing that you have ever done in a car?

(CHUCKLEL.Is that a real question?

All right, from the look on his face and the three shades of red, I decided to leave this question alone!

How fast have you driven on the freeway?

I do not know, exactly.

What has been the worst wreck that you have ever had?

Right off of this driveway, right here, two summers ago in my old Ridgeline. I had it packed up and I was going away for a month. I had all of my workout equipment in the back of my pick-up and I could not see out the back window. I had a whole bunch of construction people here because of the stuff that I was doing to the house. I have a bad habit because, when I go backwards, I look out of the driver’s side and watch the grass on the ground. I did not see that a guy pulled up right behind me in his construction truck. I had the music really loud and I floored it, going fast, and I smashed the whole side of my car to the point that I could not open the doors. Wrecked his truck, wrecked my truck. Not a serious accident, but that was the worst damage… other than that, I have not had any serious injury accidents.

Have you ever driven so fast that the governor kicked in?

I do not think that I have ever done that. I did not know that it would even happen. So, you are going that fast that it shuts off?

Yes. Did you know that your Suburban probably has a governor on it?

I am only in the Suburban with my kids and would not go that fast for the governor to kick in. I am gonna be in my Suburban one day and call you because you said that it would cut off if I were to go 100. Hey, it did not cut off and I am in jail.

What is your favorite color combination with a car?

Black on black.

Do you always buy a leather interior or is a cloth inte­rior okay?

I do not like cloth at all, so, if I had the choice, I would go with leather all of the time.

Do you feel that your career has affected your choice in the automobiles that you have chosen and pur­chased?

No, not at all. It would probably go the other way. lean get nice cars, but I just do not want them. I had a nice car when I first started. What affects my choice is my situation, my needs, my practicality. I have an old Suburban, but it is the best that I have ever had. When I need to pack everybody up, I do not have to worry about how I pack…you know what I mean? It’s just as easy as chucking everything in and we go. The pick-up is great if you need to throw stuff in the back, and I can fit all my kids in there. I base my choice of vehicles on that it has to be a truck. I do not really like cars.

Now about Rod the Bod.

What is your workout routine like?

Six days a week. Five days are more intense than the sixth day, which is a Saturday. A little lighter, then nothing on Sunday. Monday through Friday, all mornings.

I wondered if he was ready to retire. He looked in great shape, but 20 years is a long time for the dally grind of any sport.

Speaking of your career…what are your plans?

I do not know how to answer that because I am not sure. I am looking forward to this coming up season: 2009-2010. We will see how it goes. I do not think that I am at the point that it is year-to-year. I have a three-year commitment that I made to the team, which I need to honor because that is the way that I have always been. I cannot see myself play­ing past that, but you never know. I do not want to be one of those guys that says that they are done, then come back. I do not like that at all.

Yeah, how many times has Brett Favre retired, then resumed his career?

Why say that you are done, then come back, you know what I mean?

I definitely took Rod to be a man of his word. My guess was that, when he was done, It was over. I was just curious if, after all these years, he wasn’t a little tired.

Do you still have the love of your sport that you had, let’s say, 20 years ago?

Yeah. It is different now. I enjoy it so much more now because I have proven myself and gone through all of that. I know where I am at with this team, and I feel comfort­able. We won the Stanley Cup, which helps. It takes that pressure off of the list. What has been great about playing is, I do not remember who taught or told me this, but you need to always appreciate every day that you have in this league because you never know when it is done. So, all along, every day, I have felt like this is great. I do not think that there is anything left, like I am missing something. I have enjoyed the whole time and now that I know that it is ending, it is better than it will be when it is over…I know that!

It seems that you are still extremely passionate about playing.

I think so. I like to win, and it is great to win with a bunch of guys. There is something that team sports provide that is really a great feeling. You are a failure most of the time, and that is what is the unbelievable reality…one team wins. You fail more than you win. It means so much when you do win, and you want to do that again. You still want to win, so I guess it is passion that I feel.

Is it all about the camaraderie of the team for you?

Big time! If you talk to any guys – especially in our sport, ‘a team sport’ – when guys retire, what they miss most is hanging out with the team, the jokes, etc., etc. You do not realize that until you do not have it anymore. That is what makes it fun.

I can see where it will be such a void in your life when it comes to your retirement and the fact that you will not be around your team at all times.

Yes, that is gonna be the toughest thing. So, when I do say that I am done, I will need that next thing. I need to have the thing that gets me out of bed at 7 a.m. What is it-that is what I worry about because I am not sure what that is gonna be yet. Hopefully, something will come up.

If you have a dream car that you have not yet pur­chased, what would that dream car be?

Ummm, that is a good question. Ummm, an old Corvette would be nice – like a late-1950s or early- 1960s model. Honestly, I also like the old Jeeps. I still love the old Jeeps where you can put the top down. And, you know, they are really hard to find now. I like old stuff like an old Wrangler with some nice chrome wheels on it to make it look nice.

What I found when I got to Rod’s home in Raleigh-Durham was the most peaceful man I ever met in my life. Yes, I said one of the toughest, hardest-hitting, most powerful shut­down centers in the NHL is very relaxed. Not only did he not pick a fight with anybody while I was there or arbitrarily body-check anybody, he was genuinely nice. Whatever hap­pens when he hits the ice is turned off when he leaves it. I’m glad I got to meet him and spend some time with him.

Standard