Uncategorized

What Did Jesus Drive? by Jason Vines

Book Reviews & Giveaways

What Did Jesus Drive?What Did Jesus Drive? by Jason Vines
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

One of my review partners read this book and reports that it is highly entertaining and even caused laughs out loud more than once. The information feels well researched and honest. What you learn here just might be important sometime down the road, and having read this book you will be more prepared. Some of the ideas presented seemed to grow from personal experience giving the book a more personal touch often lacking in other books with similar audience. We were provided an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This in no way influenced our opinion.

View original post

Standard
Uncategorized

Ford Expedition, Barbara Terry

Dear Barbara Terry,

I enjoy your column and always find something beneficial and interesting, especially since my only and most talented activity in a car is turning on the ignition!

Here is my question. I just purchased a new Ford Expedition, Limited 4×4. I love the truck and hope to put many interesting miles on it as my wife and I really enjoy driving around the country. I thought, however, that the Limited edition would have a feature indicating the “outside air temperature”. The manual shows that some models of the Expedition have that feature, but as I am getting familiar with the truck, I can’t find it. There are three scenarios in the manual and it seems I got the one without that feature.

Is there some after-market device that I can get that would provide me that feature? I had it in the previous car and got used to it.

Thanks for your help and keep up the good work.

Mike and Lorena

Standard
Uncategorized

Purchasing a car with Paintwork, Barbara Terry

What I mean by “Paintwork” is a vehicle that has been painted by a body shop somewhere on the car’s hood, door, fender, etc. A car should not be overlooked simply because it has had repairs that include painting. Frequently my customers ask “Has the car ever been in an accident?” As they ask this question, it appears that they have a preconceived idea that if it has been in accident, then I will not buy it. Would I buy a car for myself with paintwork or even one that had been seriously smacked around to create frame damage? Yes, as long as the repair was performed properly and the car isn’t driving down the road sideways. Paintwork can be minor, such as a car that had been keyed from a scorned partner in a relationship or a fender bender or major as a result of a smash-um up collision where a compact import meets a one ton dual pick-up truck (when the two vehicles have had a very intimate conversation on the freeway swapping paint and metal). Don’t walk away just because there has been some repair work. My most interesting personal experience was colliding with a bull Elk about the size of a thoroughbred racehorse one night in Colorado. I was driving a 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee about 70 miles per hour when the two of us met eye to eye. After the impact most of the front end of the Jeep was sitting right in the passenger front seat and the elk was pretty toasted and twisted up in the motor. I walked away with a concussion, (took about a week to feel better). The point is that after some extensive repair, that Jeep it is now driving down the road just fine. So just because you learn that your next potential vehicle has been in an accident because there has been paintwork, it doesnt necessarily mean that the vehicle was run over by an 18 wheeler and now has major problems. I would definitely have it inspected, run a history report on it if you like and see it through. You will likely get a good deal on a vehicle that you will be happy with for a long time.

Barbara Terry

Standard
Uncategorized

Changing your Tires, Barbara Terry

I have always liked the little tricks of the trade. When I first started driving, my mom helped me out with this one. You are going to love the simplicity of it. Take a standard US penny with Abe Lincoln’s head on it. Insert the penny into a space between the tread of the tire. If you can see the top of his majestic head, you better take a trip down to your local tire joint and slap 4 spanking new ones on your mode of transportation. A more conservative approach would be to pay attention to the mileage allotted for the life of the tire or if you think the tread is getting a little weak, then get your tire store to inspect them and give you their opinion. I would recommend spending an little extra dough and get the Road Hazard Warranty offered, it will save you in the long run pertaining to the life of your tires, also it is very important to have your tires balanced and rotated every 5000 to 7000 miles.

I would love my readers to write in with any other little tricks of the trade that I may not be aware of. Looking forward to checking them out!

Question: Sent in by Tom Brown. My bright lights are not working on my car.
Answer: Hi Tom, Okay, a few things may be wrong here. First of all I would check to see if it was just the bulb, then I would recommend replacing whichever headlight you is not illuminating. If the problem still exists you will need to venture into the bright light switch on your steering column, or if you are driving around in your grandparents car, you will have to check into the switch on the floorboard, you know the one down on the floor by your left foot.

Question: Sent it by Rebecca Chung. Hi, My car seems to have a hard time starting and not stalling in wet weather. Will you please tell me why?
Answer: If you car runs great in dry weather but is impossible to keep running in wet weather, it is more than likely a crack in your distributor cap. I do not know how dirty you want to get your hands under the hood performing mechanical repairs. I would suggest next time it is damp, pop your hood, locate your distributor cap, unscrew it, take a clean dry cloth and wipe off the under belly of the cap making sure it is very dry, then replace it by screwing it back on. If your car starts right up, then we have figured out the repair that will need to be addressed. Keep in mind though that as soon as a little moisture works its way back to that cap, the problem will reoccur. Most importantly always think safety first. I am all about being very careful and safe when I am working on anything related to my car. Always make sure you turn your engine off, engage your emergency brake before attempting any chore. Keep in mind that those parts under the hood that resemble a jumbled mess of metal get very hot so be extremely cautious and careful not to burn yourself.

Standard
Uncategorized

How Often Should You Change Your Oil?, Barbara Terry

I have always been an adamant believer in checking and changing your oil on a regular basis. The rule of thumb is every 1500 miles, but if all cars were the same, it would be a boring world now wouldn’t it? What has proven best for me is to do what is best for my specific car. First, I check my oil every 500 miles, or spend an extra 5 minutes while filling up and have the attendant check it for me. You can not tell what oil leaks you may be experiencing sporting around town from the inside of your car. If your car is like mine, well after 300 thousand miles, I am always springing a leak. Do you suppose it is time that I take a trip to the nearest car lot and treat myself to a spanking brand new SUV. When checking your oil, you should always turn the motor off, and use your emergency brake; I am all about safety when spending time under the hood! Pull the oil dipstick out, if you seem to be having a hard time locating this you might want to refer to the owner’s manual. Secondly wipe it clean with a cloth, stick it back in and when you pull it out you will be able to read the oil level on the dip stick. Some automobiles require 30 weight while others require 40 weight. If you are not sure which is best for your car, refer to your owners manual or check with your local mechanic. Also, pay attention when checking your oil level to the color and consistency of your oil. The oil should always be pretty thin with a rich medium brown color. If it too dark (more black than brown), it needs changed. Preventive maintenance will assure a prolonged life for your car.

Question: Sent in by Ms Hill. My 1996 Nissan Maxima has started missing, what is wrong with it?
Answer: Well Ms Hill, it could be a number of things. First, since your car is fuel injected, I would recommend checking your fuel injectors, one may be clogged and definitely check your spark plugs, your spark plug wires and your vacuum hoses. If you are uncertain as to how to do this, please ask a qualified mechanic.

Question: Sent in by Dee Sneed. Hi, Barbara, I was wondering why my car shakes when I apply my brakes?
Answer: Hi Dee Sneed! It could be one of several problems. Your rotors may need to be turned, your calipers might be grabbing or your brake pads might be ancient and need to be replaced. I would strongly suggest having a mechanic look for these problems. A malfunction like this can only get worse and the repair will usually cost more if it is not addressed early.

Barbara Terry

Standard
Uncategorized

Dangers at the Pump, Barbara Terry

Believe it or not pumping gas is not the safest daily routine out there. You might think that I am going to discuss the obvious hazards of smoking at the gas station. I believe that you can figure that one out. There should be clear warnings about static electricity posted at your local gas station stating the risks involved while pumping the fuel that gets us down the road. The Petroleum Equipment Institute is campaigning to make us more aware of the dangers associated with static electricity at gas pumps. Being a woman trying to multitask, while pumping gas I usually get back in my car, adjust the radio to my favorite song, call my boyfriend to remind him to pick up my dry cleaning, and of course check to see if I am in need of more of what most of us women love most,…quality makeup. Static electricity can be created while getting in and out of your car and then finishing filling your tank. Fires have been started and deaths have occurred. I will warn you to never use a cell phone and please avoid getting back into your car until you have finished your duty at the gas pump. If you absolutely have to get back into your car while the gas is pumping, make sure you get out, shut the door, and touch the metal on the door before you grasp the nozzle. This will discharge whatever static electricity may be lingering around your body. On the other hand, we should simply be more like the men in our lives and stick with the procedure until your fuel tank on your vehicle is full.

Question: Sent in by Randy Sciletti. My wife’s 1996 Dodge Neon blows a ton of white smoke as she is driving, what do you think the problem is?
Answer: Hi Mr. Sciletti, Dodge had a serious problem with the motor they put into the Neon, starting with the first year it came out in 1995, you more than likely have a blown head gasket or as some mechanically oriented people refer to it as a “cracked head”. Basically, compressed air from a cylinder is mixing with the fluids in your cooling system and it creates a white colored steam. You can either fix the cracked head if extensive damage has not been done to the motor or I would suggest checking into a rebuilt motor that will fit the year and the make of your car, preferably not another Neon motor.

Question: Sent it by Tammy Frankel. I noticed the other day that I had a bubble like thing on one of my tires, what is this and is it dangerous?
Answer: Okay, the store where you purchased your tires should without an argument take the defective tire back and replace it at no charge, provided of course that they are still under the warranty subject to mileage limitations. The bubble is a weakness in the tire usually caused by an error in manufacturing or as a result of unusual contact (e.g. a curb). As far as it being dangerous, picture this, you are on the highway doing 80 mph and the tire blows out because of the weak spot which has now formed a bubble. This could be a life threatening situation. I strongly suggest replacing the defective tire ASAP.

Barbara Terry

Standard
Uncategorized

Pets riding in Cars, Barbara Terry

Six years ago my yellow lab was just six weeks old. All pet owners remember that first day of taking on the huge responsibility of pet ownership including cute puppy breath and shoe destruction (“why the heck must you always pick my $400.00 Stilettos and reject those stinky rubber fishing boots)? I had Rocky nestled on my left shoulder tucked under my hair until he became fascinated with chewing and pulling on my earring on his first car ride…bad idea! As the weeks and months went by he outgrew me holding him and took his permanent position in the passenger seat or as he refers to it as his seat. How many of us allow the pooches to stick their heads out the window with their jowls flapping in the wind and slobber scattering everywhere. What is the alternative? Should we buckle up our little furry ones in child safety seats as puppies and harness then in as adult doggies? Whatever happened to throwing them in the back of the pickup, now they ride in air-conditioned leathered up seats while they watch their favorite episode of Lassie on the DVD mounted in the rear of the SUV. I know my Rocky is especially fond of the heated seats in the wintertime. We only have so many years to love our pets, so it is important that we take our furry friends along with us on errands after all. Bottom line, I do not see any problem with allowing our pets to hop in and go for a ride if the owner and/or driver always makes sure your pet is never blocking the driver’s view and you never roll down the window so far that it can fall or jump out of the vehicle. I also encourage you to put them in their own area in the car. The most important situation to avoid is your pooch distracting you when you should be paying attention to the road by riding in your seat with you and endangering others.

Barbara Terry

Standard